Why a Research Strategy Matters in Preventing and Responding to Pandemics

The World Health Organization's Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework seems to have all of the right elements: It calls for sharing influenza viruses, surveillance, stockpiles of medicines and vaccines, and more. Yet it rests on shaky footing.

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Translating Research to Public Health Action

During a recent keynote presentation at the Innovation in Infectious Diseases Research symposium, I gave the following challenge: To really translate research to public health action, we need to understand what meaningful collaboration looks like.

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The Future Of Medicaid: When Improving Upon The Wheel, Start With Something Round

As states and the federal government jointly design Medicaid's future, let's include what we know works - and eliminate what does not.

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Categories: U.S. Health

One More Time With Zika: Investment in Prevention Costs Less, Means Better Health

Investments in local, state and federal public health infrastructure are necessary to stop the spread of Zika and other infectious diseases in the United States, as well as address the health outcomes for those who are infected.

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Pandemic Preparedness: Moving Beyond Public Health

A pandemic is the global spread of an infectious disease. While Ebola didn't meet the definition, it revealed how little prepared we were to manage the risks in places like hospitals and airports both operationally and politically.

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The History of Unrecognized “AIDS” in Monkeys 1969-1980: What Can We Learn for Future Outbreaks of Infectious Diseases?

AIDS was recognized in humans in 1981 and simian AIDS was described in 1983-1985. However, researchers anecdotally reported seeing cases of opportunistic infections of AIDS in monkeys much earlier.

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Creating an Interface between Health Authorities and Central Budget Agencies: Implications for Domestic Resource Mobilization for Health

When external health funding dwindles as government revenue grows in recipient countries, a natural reaction is to clamor for increased domestic financing for health.

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Social Determinants of Health: Can We Address Equity with Communications?

Both having good health and coping with challenges to health are a journey. Inadequate resources make a successful journey harder. At an individual level, lack of personal resources such as income and knowledge, limit an individual's ability to follow optimal paths to health and vice versa. At a macro level, our society has a finite amount of resources - both monetary and service‐related - that realistically will not provide everything to everyone. We do not "naturally" think about health in terms of social factors. However, our health is significantly affected by our homes, jobs, and schools. The social determinants of health are the economic and social conditions—and their distribution among the population – that influence individual and group differences in health status.

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