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Improving Nutrition for Tajik Mothers and Children


Highlights

  • Improve the nutrition, morbidity, and mortality of mothers and children
  • Training government officials on social and behavior change approaches
  • Increase access to maternal and child health and nutrition services
The Challenge

The primary goal of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Healthy Mother Healthy Baby (HMHB) activity in Tajikistan is to improve the nutritional status of mothers and children under two and reduce their morbidity and mortality rates. To achieve that goal, HMHB aims to improve the quality and availability of lifesaving, evidence-based health interventions for women and children in Khatlon province. HMHB also provides technical support to try to improve social norms on nutrition and health care for mothers and children.

The Approach

HMHB will scale up and institutionalize quality health and nutrition services to mothers, newborns, and children. It will use social and behavior change to improve nutrition and maternal and child health, including a focus on water, hygiene, and sanitation. In addition, HMHB will improve Tajikistan’s health system by building the technical capacity, leadership, management, and policy reform potential of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection of Population and other health institutions and communities.

The Results

HMHB expects to increase availability and access to high quality maternal and child health and nutrition services and commodities and improve professional and institutional capacity and system ability to manage maternal and child health and nutrition programs. The activity also expects to increase political will and resources for maternal and child health and nutrition and stakeholder engagement. HMHB will improve social and behavior change strategies for maternal and child health and nutrition. The activity also will introduce innovations to change social norms around high-impact maternal, child health, and nutrition behaviors and strengthen linkages between community and primary health facilities.