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Opioid Use Disorder (OUD), Housing Instability, and Housing Options for Recovery


Highlights

  • Stable housing is a critical component of recovery from OUD.
  • Abt is working with ASPE to document housing models.
  • An issue brief will summarize the overall study findings.
The Challenge

More than six in 10 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involve an opioid, and an estimated 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the homeless who survive an opioid overdose and try to recover, obtaining and maintaining housing is one of the greatest challenges. Stable housing is a critical component of recovery from opioid use disorder (OUD).

Quote for Opioid Use Disorder project description

We need to understand which individuals with opioid use disorder are most likely to experience housing instability, and which housing models work best for people receiving treatment, to address the challenges experienced by those impacted by both OUD and the experience of homelessness.
Sue Pfefferle
Associate/Scientist
The Approach

Abt is working with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) to document various housing models for individuals who experience housing instability or homelessness and OUD. Abt’s approach offers a systematic look at models that might aid individuals in their recovery so that HUD and providers can use and evaluate them. Abt is conducting an environmental scan; interviews with experts in homelessness, housing, and OUD; family advocates; and providers.

The Results

An issue brief will summarize the overall study findings. It will include a housing typology with descriptions of housing models best-suited to a variety of populations affected by both OUD and homelessness.